• 40% of bullied targets are believed to suffer adverse                health effects
• 29% of targets remain silent about their experiences
• 71% of employer reactions are harmful to targets
• 60% of coworker reactions are harmful to targets
• To stop it, 65% of targets lose their original jobs
• 77% of Americans support enacting a new law
• 45% report worsening of work relationships, post-   Trump election

2017 WBI U.S. Workplace Bullying Survey, June 2017 - Major funding from Minnesota Association of Professional Employees - Report by Gary Namie, PhD, Research Director © 2017, Workplace Bullying Institute, All rights reserved. In our 2017 National Survey workplace bullying was defined as repeated mistreatment of an employee by one or more employees; abusive conduct that is: threatening, humiliating, or intimidating, work sabotage, or verbal abuse.

Bullying is “abusive conduct,” referring to its most serious forms only. This is consistent with the definition used in the  Healthy Workplace Bill. Even with this high threshold, workplace bullying remains an American epidemic. Bullied individuals pay dearly with the loss of their economic livelihood to stop it. In the absence of legal prohibitions against it, employers are failing to take responsibility for its prevention and correction. 

Key Findings

• 19% of Americans are bullied, another 19% witness it
• 61% of Americans are aware of abusive conduct in the workplace
• 60 million Americans are affected by it
• 70% of perpetrators are men; 60% of targets are women
• Hispanics are the most frequently bullied race
• 61% of bullies are bosses, the majority (63%) operate alone
http://www.workplacebullying.org/wbiresearch/wbi-2017-survey/

     July 7th, 2017    2017 WBI U.S. Survey:  Strong Support for a New Law Against Abusive Conduct at Work 

77% of Americans support a new law to address abusive conduct at work

 The Workplace Bullying Institute commissioned Zogby Analytics to conduct the 2017 national scientific U.S. survey across two days in late April. The stratified random sample of 1,008 individuals represented all adult Americans. It was WBI’s fourth national survey.                                                      To read more:  http://www.workplacebullying.org/2017-hwb/

We used the definition of workplace bullying that matches perfectly the definition codified in the Healthy Workplace Bill. Bullying is repeated mistreatment but also “abusive conduct.” We asked American survey respondents to consider only the most serious forms of bullying.

When the 2017 WBI U.S. Workplace Bullying data were collected, legislation written to address abusive conduct in American workplaces – the Healthy Workplace Bill – had been introduced in 30 states and Territories. The bill had not yet been enacted into law in its complete form.

We asked all respondents [N = 1,008] whether they supported or opposed such a law.

Wording of the Support for New Law Question: Do you support or oppose enactment of a new law that would protect all workers from repeated health-harming abusive mistreatment in addition to protections against illegal discrimination and harassment?

It is clear that the American public wants to see worker protections against abusive conduct extended beyond the anti-discrimination statutes – 77% support specific anti-bullying legislation when strongly support and somewhat support proportions are combined.                                                                                                                     For more information: 

http://www.workplacebullying.org/wbiresearch/wbi-2017-survey/